Tea Party on the Decline

The historic 2010 midterm elections proved to be one of the most successful election years for the GOP. Republicans won six U.S. senate seats, 63 seats in the House of Representatives, six governorships, and 680 seats in state legislators. Apprehension towards the Affordable Care Act and the overall perception of the Obama Administration gave rise to the Tea Party, the boisterous, right wing faction of the GOP. Establishment Republicans such as Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski and Delaware Congressman Michael Castle lost their primaries to “anti-establishment” Tea Party candidates.

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How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Drone

In recent years, we have seen the rise of a new form of military technology called drones. With their arrival has come the inevitable response of critics in a self-righteous hurry to condemn drones – more formally known as Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) – as the newest atrocities of modern warfare. This newfound hatred for drones is not surprising, but it is completely misguided and is only a result of misinformation and fear of what we don’t fully understand.

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GOP Weaknesses

The difficulty in predicting the size of Republican gains next month arises from several factors that seem, thus far, to have shielded the Democrats from the full consequences of Barack Obama’s unpopularity. One reflects closely related political truisms: money talks, incumbency is usually an advantage. The fundraising strength of Democratic Senate incumbents and their national campaign committee is predictable; they’re incumbents and their party has controlled the upper house for eight years. But other factors that have inhibited a strong Republican wave are longstanding within the GOP and its base—problems for which there is no equivalent, or a much smaller one, among the Democrats. Here as elsewhere, analysts of American politics are often mistaken when tending to assume symmetry between the parties.

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