Fare Thee Well

On May 26 I will graduate – a joyful and bittersweet occasion. I am ready to depart, but am left wondering how four years moved so quickly. And however imperfect my reminiscing, I will nevertheless remember my time at Hamilton College with thoughts of gratitude – such a small place up on a hill, chock-full of gifted people with big dreams. As Robert Frost declared in his poem “Birches,” I have endeavored “to fill a cup / Up to the brim / And even above the brim.” And at the graduation ceremony that Sunday, I will think the morning is full of hope and promise, filled even to the very brim. Amen to all that.

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U.S. Troops at the Border: When is the Time to Leave?

In October 2018, President Trump announced that he would be sending more than 5,000 active-duty military personnel to the U.S.-Mexico border in response to an approaching caravan of migrants. The troops would be there to support the Border Patrol and National Guard in their mission to secure the border. Currently, the Posse Comitatus Act prohibits active-duty troops from performing law enforcement activities.

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Re: “Ban College Sports”

The April 23 edition of The Monitor features an article by Evan Weinstein ’19 arguing that college sports should be banned, since they make life worse for athletes and non-athletes alike. I will attempt to respond to each of its arguments and defend college athletics.

Like 30 percent of our student body, I am a varsity athlete. As an athlete and a fan, I have come to appreciate the innumerable benefits that sports teams bring to our campus and campuses across the nation. Student athletes are privileged to take part in an extracurricular activity that forges deep bonds of friendship and trust, which last well beyond our college years. They have the opportunity to represent their school and engage in the kind of education that happens on a playing field. Non-athletes benefit as well, most obviously in the entertainment our sports provide. The hundreds of people banging on the glass of Sage Rink during the Citrus Bowl, and cheering on our men’s basketball team during a deep playoff run, should make clear that our students enjoy watching their peers deliver electric performances. These are but a few of the virtues and benefits of college sports.

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Reflections on an Economist’s Earth Day Lecture

On April 22 the Alexander Hamilton Institute hosted Dr. Mike Rizzo, a lecturer in economics at the University of Rochester and a senior fellow of the AHI, to discuss American environmental economics on what happened to be Earth Day. The event was part of the AHI continuing education course, “Science and Government.”

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The Democratic Party and Common Ground

Hamilton’s most recent installment of Common Ground, featuring Reince Priebus and Jim Messina, was notable less for on-stage disagreement and more for the political and campaign wisdom both participants displayed. One of the most striking points was their agreement that the current large Democratic primary field is positive for the Democratic Party. Such a claim seems counterintuitive, and demonstrates an evolution in thinking from the punditry in the 2016 primaries.

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Notre Dame: What Should Be Done?

In the wake of the tragic burning of the world-famous 800-year-old Notre Dame Cathedral, opinions on what should be done with the building vary greatly. The toppled steeple, destroyed beams, collapsed roof, and general rubble caused by the fire leave the options for renovations wide open. With currently over a billion dollars in restoration funds available, money appears to be no obstacle.

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